Chronicle of Bavaria

The Chronicle of Bavaria

1103

Siegfried, the firstborn son, was born to Herzog Otto III of Bavaria.

1104

Herzog Otto III of Bavaria died after a period of illness on 8 August. His son, Siegfried, succeeded to the throne of the Herzogswürde with a grand ceremony in München. His mother, Adeltrudis, served as regent. A goat with three heads was born in Nordgau.

1105

Kaiser Ludwig died a natural death on 19 July.

1106

Bavaria went to war against Herzogin Adelheid of Tyrol.

1107

Hedwig von Nordheim married Cristoforo.

1108

Bavaria won the war against Adelheid Hupoldinger and claimed the Grafschaft of St. Gallen.

1109

Hedwig von Nordheim married Philipp, son of Pope Innocentius II. Siegfried von Nordheim created the Herzogswürde of Tyrol, becoming Herzog of Bavaria, Swabia, and Tyrol.

1110

Tens of thousands of crows invaded Niederbayern just before the harvest, causing much damage to the farmers’s fields.

1111

The Cathar heresy spread its woeful presence in the county of Nordgau.

1112

Villagers saw blood raining from the sky in the county of Niederbayern. King Bretislav of Bohemia , in his bid for independence from the Holy Roman Empire, seized Salzburg.

1113

An uncommonly great number of children were born this year in Chur. King Bretislav of Bohemia was defeated in Oberbayern by the Kaiser.

1114

Siegfried von Nordheim was crowned the first König of Bavaria.

1115

A ten foot tall woman was crucified in the county of Passau.

1116

A giant destroyed several villages in Oberbayern, but then disappeared without trace.

1117

An uncommonly great number of children were born this year in Tirol.

1118

Hedwig, the heir of König Siegfried of Bavaria, died under suspicious circumstances on 14 February. Gisela von Nordheim married March, son of Bishop Acarias of Paimpol. The king tried but failed to imprison Graf Norbert von Niederbayern, causing him to come out in open rebellion.

1119

König Siegfried of Bavaria married Princess Eve, daughter of King Henri III of France. Graf Norbert’s rebellion was crushed.

1120

König Siegfried of Bavaria died after a period of illness on 18 March. His aunt, Gisela, succeeded to the throne in a grand ceremony in München. A strange plague killed thousands of wild rabbits in the county of Württemberg.

1121

Pope Alexander III, leader of all Catholic faithful, died a natural death on 28 December.

1122

Lothar, the firstborn son, was born to Königin Gisela of Bavaria. The Königin went to war against Herzog Dietrich III of Upper Lorraine.

1125

Several people in Oberbayern spoke of seeing strange shapes dancing on the moon.

1126

Königin Gisela of Bavaria defeated Herzog Dietrich III of Upper Lorraine to claim the Herzogswürde of Upper Lorraine.

1127

Kaiser Filibert died comatose in bed on 7 September.

1128

Gisela von Nordheim created the title of Herzogswürde of Baden, confirming her growing power with much ceremony and celebration. Graf Friedrich von Ulm rose up in rebellion against the queen, demanding that the kingdom institute an elective monarchy.

1129

Pope Gregorius VII declared a Crusade, wherein all faithful Catholics were called to help conquer Jerusalem from the infidel. Königin Gisela accepted the demands of the rebels, and made Bavaria an elective monarchy.

1130

Liutbert von Nordheim married Princess Klára, daughter of King Kristóf of Hungary. Königin Gisela joined the Crusade.

1131

Königin Gisela led the army of Bavaria to help take Harbijah from the enemy. Upon her return from the Holy Land, she declared the independence of Bavaria from the Holy Roman Empire.

1132

Königin Gisela was victorious in the battle of Schwyz against the army of the Holy Roman Empire, but was then defeated in Ulm. The Crusade declared by Gregorius ended with the successful conquest of Jerusalem.

1133

Königin Gisela was victorious in the battle of Württemberg against the army of the Holy Roman Empire.

1134

In Oberbayern, the people celebrated the benevolent rule of Königin Gisela.

1135

Bavaria saw an unusually bountiful harvest this year.

1136

Königin Gisela joined her allies from Bohemia, Brunswick, and Denamrk in battle against Kaiser Georg, but King Bjørn of Denmark proved incapable of paying his Sami mercenaries, who abandoned the fight and turned against him in the north, and so the kaiser was victorious, and Königin Gisela was forced to surrender to him. The grafs of Metz and Sundgau rose up against the Königin. The Bohemians, still fighting their own war for independence, besieged Niederbayern, but were defeated. Kaiser Georg punished Königin Gisela for her rebellion by seizing from her many titles, including the Herzogswürde of Swabia, which he gave to Friedrich von Rheinfelden.

1137

Königin Gisela of Bavaria lost the battle of Oberbayern against the army of Metz, commanded by Graf Hans.

1138

Prinz Lothar of Bavaria married Winfrida. Königin Gisela of Bavaria was victorious in the battle of Sundgau against the army of Herzog Meinhard of Alsace.

1139

Königin Gisela joined King Bjørn of Danmark in war against his enemies. She was victorious in the battle of Mainz against the army of Herzog Meinhard of Alsace once again, forcing him to make peace. The army marched far into the north, into the jaws of winter, in pursuit of the Sami mercenaries who had betrayed them years before.

1140

Pope Gregorius VII, leader of all Catholic faithful, died of an infected wound on 13 July. The Sami were defeated and their captain taken away in chains.

1141

Tens of thousands of crows birds invaded Niederbayern just before the harvest, causing much damage to the farmers’s fields.

1142

People in Niederbayern claimed to have seen two suns at the same time.

1143

In this year Kaiser Georg went mad. Seeing plots all around him, he tried to arrest many of his vassals and councillors, who rose up in rebellion against him. Königin Gisela honored her alliance with Graf Heinrich, who went to war against the Mad Kaiser. The kaiser tried to arrest Herzog Friedrich of Swabia, but failed, and so Swabia rebelled against him. The herzog and the kaiser quickly arranged a peace, and the kaiser rewarded the herzog by naming him his designated regent.

1144

Königin Gisela died a natural death on 23 July. Her son, Lothar, succeeded to the throne of the Kingdom with a grand ceremony in München. Christine, the firstborn daughter, was born to the king.

1145

The Mad Kaiser died, and his son Victor became the new kaiser, under the regency of Friedrich von Rheinfelden. Victor died under suspicious circumstances on 14 May, and Friedrich became the new kaiser, called “the Noble.” Bohemia declared war upon the kaiser, and König Lothar asserted Bavaria’s independence. Left with the consequences of the Mad Kaiser’s reign, perhaps grateful for the role that Queen Regent Adeltrudis played in his own ascension from a lowly graf, and facing the strength that Bavaria could still muster despite the defeats it had suffered, the kaiser acceded to the king’s demands and recognized the independence of Bavaria.

1146

People in Aquileia claimed to have seen two suns at the same time.

1147

König Lothar II supported Kaiser Friedrich in war against his enemies. He led the armies of Bavaria north and defeated the rebels at Kleve, but the kaiser relented, and allowed the empire to pass to Adalhard.

1148

A star fell from the sky in Steiermark, killing three cows.

1149

König Lothar joined Herzogin Hildegard of Swabia, the heir of Friedrich the Noble, in war against her enemies. The king’s men apprehend many impious forgers who dealt in false relics.

1150

König Lothar was victorious in the battle of Württemberg against the army of Ademar. Ulfcytel of Bamburgh led the armies of Bavaria to victory in Grisons.

1151

Bavaria was attacked by Kaiser Adalhard, who laid claim to the Grafschaft of Baden.

1152

In this year was fought the Battle of Zähringen, where the brave Graf Thomas of Breisgau joined König Lothar against the kaiser’s hosts. On each side, over twenty thousand men faced each other, and there over twelve thousand men perished, Graf Thomas among them, before the king claimed victory and the armies of the empire were put to flight on 21 October.

1153

South of the Alps, the retreating army of the kaiser found respite and new allies. König Lothar and Graf Walram, the son and heir of Thomas of Breisgau who died upon the fields of Zähringen, took to the mountain passes of Grisons, and there prepared to meet the enemy once again, but there were defeated by the seemingly endless numbers of the empire’s soldiers.

1154

The king’s men were defeated by the army of the Holy Roman Empire in Kempten.

1155

König Lothar met the kaiser’s army again in Kempten, but this time, by God’s will, prevailed against the invaders.

1156

Again Graf Walram and König Lothar marched together against the kaiser, this time in Baden, and again prevailed in a terrible battle, by the grace of our Lord. The king pursued the retreating army of the empire and defeated them again in Nordgau.

1157

The king continued to pursue the retreating armies of the empire and defeated them again in the mountains of Grisons. With this victory, the kaiser was forced to admit defeat and acknowledge König Lothar the Just as the rightful king of Bavaria and liege of Baden.

1158

For three days the earth shook, and outside a farm in Oberbayern a giant rift formed in the ground. Flames leapt up from it, and with it the wailing and cries of the damned. König Lothar ordered rocks brought to fill in the gap, but they would not fill the hole. The priests of the kingdom were gathered to perform an exorcism, and so by God’s grace the gate of hell was closed.

1159

Angered by König Lothar the Just who had sealed shut his door, the Devil worked to take revenge against the king. He seduced his wife, Winfrida. The king’s chaplain identified his daughter, Eufemia, as the Devil’s child, and Winfrida as a witch. Pope Urbanus II announced the formal annulment of the royal marriage. Later that year, at the behest of his councillors, the king remarried, to Egelina, daughter of Count Hugh of Foggia.

1160

Christine von Nordheim married Gerhard, son of Duke Waldemar of Carinthia. March, the father of König Lothar, died of an infected wound on 24 December.

1161

Burchard, the firstborn son, was born to König Lothar II. Bavaria was attacked by the rebels in Italy, led by Gherardo. IJsbrecht van Hesbaie led the armies of Bavaria to victory against them in Verona.

1162

Pope Urbanus II declared a Crusade, wherein all faithful Catholics were called to help conquer Aragon from the infidel. König Lothar took the cross and was victorious in Spain. The adultery of Königin Egelina was revealed, and she was imprisoned, but the king relented for his continuing love for her, and she was released. Pope Urbanus II died comatose in bed on 6 December.

p>

1163


Bavaria saw an unusually bountiful harvest this year.


1164


Pope Nicolaus III, leader of all Catholic faithful, died bedridden and infirm on 16 September.


1165


Pope Leo X, leader of all Catholic faithful, died a natural death on 19 February.


1166


Pope Silvester IV announced the formal annulment of the marriage between König Lothar and his unfaithful wife, Egelina de Hauteville. The king then married Herzogin Hildegard of Swabia, the daughter of Friedrich von Rheinfelden the Noble. He supported the Herzogin in her war against the Gräfin Beatrix, who had raised up in rebellion against her. Their armies met in Fürstenberg, and the king was victorious.


1167


Kaiser Adalhard laid claim to the Grafschaft of Breisgau, and invaded Bavaria for it.


1168


In Tirol, the king defeated the hosts of the Holy Roman Empire, but an even greater force then came upon them and defeated the defenders of Bavaria in turn, and the king was forced to surrender, ceding Breisgau to the empire. It is said that then Graf Walram began to work against the kaiser in secret, intent to employ intrigue where force of arms had failed to return Breisgau to the kingdom of Bavaria.


1169


Several people in Oberbayern spoke of seeing strange shapes dancing on the moon.


1170


König Lothar laid claims to the Grafschäften of Österreich, which had fallen to Bohemian invaders many years before. Smallpox ravaged the land, killing many, including the king, who perished on 15 May. His son, Burchard, succeeded to the throne with a grand ceremony in München. Kaiser Adalhard again invaded Bavaria, while IJsbrecht van Hesbaie defeated the Bohemians at Olomouc, and then again at Plzen.


1171


IJsbrecht van Hesbaie led the army of Bavaria to victory against the Bohemians at Znojmo.


1172


Ugues de Brindas led the army of Bavaria against the Bohemians at Cieszyn, Plzen, Znojmo. Mszczuj Piast led them at Olomouc, and in all of these contests the Bavarians prevailed, so that King Benes the Fat was forced to surrender and cede the Grafschäften of Österreich to Bavaria. König Burchard created the title of Duchy of Austria, confirming his growing power with much ceremony and celebration. The Bavarians were attacked then by the army of the Holy Roman Empire, crossing Bohemia to assault them in Olomouc with seemingly endless numbers, but by the grace of God Mszczuj Piast led the Bavarians to victory against them, despite their numbers.


1173


Mszczuj Piast pursued the empire’s fleeing army and defeated them again in Brandenburg, but it was not enough to change the course of the war, and König Burchard was forced to surrender. In this year a French adventurer named Ebbon raised an army and tried to seize the kingdom.


1174


Pope Silvester IV, leader of all Catholic faithful, died a natural death on 22 February. Laurence of Bamburgh led the king’s army against Ebbon’s Host and defeated them in Chur. The Crusaders expelled the infidels from Aragon, claiming victory in the Crusade declared by Pope Urbanus II twelve years before for the servants of God.


1175


Ebbon was captured and his host destroyed.


1176


König Burchard laid claim to the Grafschaft of Bamberg, and went to war against King Tibor of Hungary for it. Laurence of Bamburgh led Bavaria’s army to victory against the Hungarians in Bamberg.


1177


King Tibor the Merry was captured in battle, and so forced to cede Bamburg to Bavaria, ending the war with Hungary. Rudolf of Burgundy rose up against Kaiser Adalhard, and Bavaria joined his war. Laurence of Bamburgh led Bavaria’s army to victory against the Holy Roman Empire at Pfalz. König Burchard came of age and married his betrothed, Martha, daughter of Isabel a Muirebe and Princess of France. He formed an alliance with King ThiÈbaut of France, and joined his war against the infidels in Spain.


1178


König Burchard went to war against King Cenek of Bohemia for the Grafschaft of Znojmo.


1179


The army of Bavaria defeated the Bohemians at Hradec, Praha, Cieszyn, and Znojmo. Pope Ioannes XIX, leader of all Catholic faithful, died a natural death on 16 June. To the king was born a daughter, named Elisabeth. Queen Martha died under suspicious circumstances a few months later, on 30 August. The king remarried to a lowborn Greek named Agathe.


1180


Bavaria saw an unusually bountiful harvest this year. Graf Thomas broke Breisgau away from the Holy Roman Empire and swore fealty to the king, restoring his realm to the kingdom of Bavaria.


1181


The army of Bavaria defeated the Bohemians at Znojmo, Lausitz, and again at Znojmo.


1182


König Burchard supported Herzog Waldemar II of Carinthia in war against his enemies.


1183


In this year, König Georg of Germany, the son of Herzogin Hildegard of Swabia who was König Burchard stepmother, asserted his independence from the Holy Roman Empire, and Bavaria stood with him. At Bamberg, Emelrich von Brandenburg led the army of Bavaria to a final victory against the Bohemians that forced King Cenek to surrender Znojmo. In Chur, the Bavarians defeated the army of Lombardy that had laid claim to the lands of Herzog Waldemar. In Nordgau, the Bavarians joined the Germans and won a great victory against Kaiser Heinrich the Usurper.


1184


In Hainaut, a small force of loyal Bavarian soldiers were attacked by a far larger army loyal to Heinrich the Usurper, and were slain. In Olomoucian, the peasants followed a former soldier named Petr to rebellion, but the king quickly ceded the grafschaft to them.


1185


An uncommonly great number of children were born this year in Tirol.


1186


The armies of Bavaria and Germany captured K&oulm;ln.


1187


Wolfard raised up a rebellion against the king, and but days later King Cenek of Bohemia invaded the kingdom, laying claim to Znojmo. The army of Bavaria was forced to head south to deal with these problems, leaving King Georg to win the final victory against the kaiser himself. Germany won its independence, ending the great struggle that Bavaria and Bohemia began with their own struggles for independence, and breaking the power of the Holy Roman Empire forever. The armies of Bavaria marched from the victory at Kön to fight the rebels in Tirol, where they were again victorious, and laid siege to their holdings in Chur.


1188


König Burchard was victorious in the battle of Oberbayern against the rebel Wolfard and all those who followed him. Königin Agathe, the wife of König Burchard, was murdered on the orders of Bürgermeister Burchard of Dachau on 7 July. König Burchard of Bavaria married Áedammair, daughter of Bishop Pilib Shannon of Tibor.


1189


Having pursued Wolfard’s rebels into Innsbruck and forced their surrender, König Burchard turned to face King Cenek’s invasion. He pursued the invaders into Bohemia, defeating them at Domazlice and Cieszyn.


1190


King Cenek of Bohemia made peace with König Burchard, and the king went to war against Herzog Meinhard II of Baden. Laurence of Bamburgh led the army of Bavaria to victory against the Herzog at Niederbayern.


1191


Duke Meinhard surrendered to the king, and so the Herzogswürde of Baden was given to Thomas of Breisgau. König Georg of Germany ceded the Grafshaft of St. Gallen to Bavaria, in thanks for its aid in winning his kingdom’s independence from the empire.


1192


Andreas, the firstborn son, was born to König Burchard and Königin Áedammair.


1193


König Burchard made a pious pilgrimage to Jerusalem.


1194


Kaiser Dietmar made war upon Germany, and so Bavaria pledged its support against him.


1195


König Burchard led the army of Bavaria against the Holy Roman Empire at Württemberg and three times at Verdun, and in all of these contests God granted him the victory.


1196


Kaiser Dietmar surrendered to the armies of Bavaria and Germany, against which he could not prevail. König Burchard supported his vassal, the penitent rebel Herzog Wolfard of Tyrol, and his ally, König Georg of Germany, in war against their enemies, and was victorious. With these victories, the king won a period of peace for the realm.


1197


The earth shook for three days in Nürnberg, killing two hundred peasants and a priest.


1198


Bavaria saw an unusually bountiful harvest this year.


1199


Egelina, the mother of König Burchard, died of the Great Pox on 11 January.


1200


A ten feet tall woman was crucified in the county of Breisgau.

Chronicle of Bavaria

Sic Semper Erat Jason